Historic Marker Program

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Since the 1980s, the SHFS Historic Marker Program has been helping local community groups commemorate their history through Historic Markers. We currently have over 150 Historic Markers in our database.
Over the years, we lost touch with many of our markers. Thanks, though, to the efforts of our summer students and volunteers over the past few years, we now have accurate locations and recent photos of most of our markers. There are still a few left to find…Click on the map below to see our markers and their locations!

norwegianplaque


But these are just dusty old plaques, right?
Maybe…and maybe not. Here are a few great podcasts1 to get you thinking about why plaques and monuments have a very important role in everyday modern life.


readtheplaque

Always Read the Plaque: Mapping Over 10,000 Global Markers & Memorials

“Keep your eyes peeled, and always read the plaque.” A story of how readtheplaque.com, a website of plaques and markers from all over the world, got started.

Click here to listen.

letsfindout

Let's Find Out (Episode 4): The Klan Query

What happens when someone asks to put up a plaque commemorating the dark side of Edmonton’s history? How does the presence of such a memorial, or the lack of it, affect a people’s experience as they make their way around the City?

Click here to listen.

memorypalace

The Memory Palace (Episode 73): Notes on an Imagined Plaque to be Added to the Statue of General Nathan Bedford Forrest, Upon Hearing that the Memphis City Council has Voted to Move it and the Exhumed Remains of General Forrest and his Wife, Mary Ann Montgomery Forrest, from their Current Location in a Park Downtown, to the Nearby Elmwood Cemetery

“Memorials aren’t memories. They have motives. They are historical, they aren’t history itself.” After a mass murder in a Charleston church, a statue of a former Klansman and military general is moved out of downtown Memphis. Nate Dimao explores why, and why it’s important to understand the history of how a monument is created.

Click here to listen.



1. A podcast is like your favorite radio program, except it's on the internet and you can listen to it as often as you like, whenever you like. You can also download it to all sorts of devices and listen from there, if you're into that sort of thing.